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Top 10 Things (x 2) You Didn’t Know about the IPI Conference

Bonnie Watts

top10May 20 marked a moment in history. You would have had to be living under a rock to have missed it. It was the final airing of the “Late Show with David Letterman” after more than 20 years. Letterman’s signature bit was his Top 10 List, circulating around a common theme or recent events.

With the 2015 IPI Conference & Expo around the corner, and to pay homage to Letterman and his farewell show, why not have a Top 10 Things (x2) You Didn’t Know about the IPI Conference? So here goes:

20. Insiders know the entire scoop—but you don’t have to be left out. We have tips from seasoned attendees that you can download to get the inside track!
19. Planning an IPI conference starts three years in advance and requires all IPI staff plus more than 150 volunteers to pull the event together each year.
18. We’re giving back and so can you! IPI wants to leave every city better than we came. For the 2015 Conference, we’ve chosen Project 150 to support. And what’s great about that is, Project 150 recipients are actually part of our volunteer group this year.
17. There are more than 100 hours of networking opportunities during the four-day event.
16. On average, an attendee gets no more than five hours of sleep a night at an IPI Conference & Expo (maybe less in Vegas…).
15. This year, IPI will be presenting our very own Shark Tank spin-off, Park Tank™ on Monday, June 29.
14. Educational sessions are broken into six tracks with a brand new track this year. We have added Building & Construction Management to our five other tracks: Customer Service, Finance, Organizational Improvement, Sustainability, and Technology.
13. If you’re looking for rapid-fire sessions that ignite a spark or idea for you, attend the Ignite sessions. They are lively, fun and fast—blink and you could miss something.
12. Many of the education opportunities are now accredited because IPI is an  ANSI/IACET provider. This means select education offerings enable you to earn  LUs, PDHs, CCM recertification points, as well as CAPP points.
11. The Expo Hall features more than 240 companies, 25 percent of which are first-time exhibiting companies.
10. IPI now offers credentialing and accreditation programs that certify organizations, professionals, and facilities. We’re setting standards and raising the level of excellence and we want you to be a part of it.
9. We recognize more than 250 individuals, organizations, and programs during our four-day event in professional recognition programs, the CAPP certification program, and in IPI’s Awards of Excellence and marketing awards programs.
8. Ever wish you could spend some more time with the presenters or participants of a particular session but the schedule moves so fast, it’s off to the next session or activity?  No worries! We’ve got you covered. On Thursday, July 2 at 8 a.m., we’re going to give you the chance to informally talk with presenters from sessions during the week and even collaborate with other attendees. Don’t miss this first-ever mixing-it-up ShopTalk!
7. Learning isn’t just for classrooms or general sessions—we offer hands-on learning with our operational Facility Tours.
6. We love first-timers! So we plan onsite orientation sessions to provide inside tips on how to best navigate — and get the most out of the conference.
5. There’s an app for that! We know technology drives this industry and we’re keeping up. The new IPICONF app for the 2015 event allows for more interaction than ever before.
4. There are more freebies than you can shake a stick at, and all you have to do is show up. Don’t miss a single event, you never know what you might miss if you aren’t there and there early!
3. Vegas is a great city with a lot of distractions and we want your undivided attention during the event, however, we want you to also have some fun and so we’ve arranged Explore the Area tours for Thursday, July 2 for you to get out and see the city. Click here to sign up.
2. Networking and meeting new colleagues doesn’t have to be inside four walls. Sign up for the CAPP Classic Golf Tournament or the 5K Fun Run for some great camaraderie, fun and prizes.
1. And just when you think it’s over, Thursday, July 2, we’re giving you a sneak peek at the 2016 IPI Conference & Expo in Nashville at the closing General Session.

In honor of our Top Ten (x2) List, if you haven’t registered yet to attend the top event of the year for the parking industry, register by Monday, June 1, 5:00 p.m. EST and use promo code TOPTENX2 to take *10% off current registration fees. We look forward to seeing you in Vegas!

*only good on full, daily, Expo hall, 5k fun run, golf, and meet and mingle tickets. Must be for new registrations only. Cannot be applied to existing registrations.

 

 

 

Reshaping Change

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By 2030, the U.S. population is projected to increase from 319 million to 358 million people. Vehicle miles traveled in the country have been trending downward since 2004. During the next 20 years, America’s 65 and over population will grow to be 19 percent of the population. America’s 72 million older baby boomers will replace the 38 million seniors we have today. Jon Martin will reveal what the Ten Transcendent Trends Reshaping the Future of Parking are and how they impact the profession. Join us at the IPI Conference on Tuesday, June 30 to check out what his research unveils.

Las Vegas offers a dilemma of its own design; too many people and too many cars—massive hotels with 3,000 to 4,000 hotel rooms each. Let’s not forget the convention centers and the casinos. The Las Vegas strip is rivals Disneyland and Times Square as one of the most intensely used entertainment zones on earth. Millennials’ tastes and desires are reversing a half century of expectations about how they want to get around.  Get ready—this is just the beginning.  Disruptive change will be a factor in any business related to the form and use of the city.  Join Gordon Price on Wednesday, July 1 as he reveals What I Learned from Las Vegas (and other lessons for our disruptive times). Is the parking industry ready for these changes?

Regardless of generation, effective communication is the key to sustaining relationships. Discover the power of a little incentive and the positivity that comes along with that. Learn to turn negatives into bragging points! Does your communication style get results? Some of the most powerful communication strategies are the most neglected ones. Join Barry Maher on Thursday, July 2 as he demonstrates the art of tactful communication and how to make a huge difference with a little motivation. This session will offer humorous insights as well as tactics for communication strategies that can be used with customers, peers and staff on how to start Slicing through the Noise: Powerful Communication for Leadership and Professional Success.

Click here to join us for these presentations and much more. These dynamic keynote speakers are waiting for you!

Poli Sci Do or Die

Casey Jones 4x5 (2)

In college. I earned a bachelor’s degree in political science and spent a good bit of my early career in the public sector working for politicians. This inevitably involved campaigning and elections and since then, I’ve watched with great interest most local, state, and federal elections. My wife teases me on Election Night as I sit riveted to the TV, watching the results roll in.

I’m as eager now to learn who has been elected to the IPI Board of Directors. While the responsibility of voting falls to someone else in my organization, I did take keen interest in the slate of candidates, reading their statements and considering how they’d impact IPI. So much talent steps forward each IPI election cycle and the voters do a great job of advancing people well-suited to serve as board members. It takes courage, thought, and commitment to run, you must allow your experience to be scrutinized, and you have to accept the chance that you will not earn enough votes. I applaud everyone willing to throw their hat in the ring and encourage more to do so. Without a diverse group of quality candidates, the board of IPI cannot effectively fulfill its mission and foster the organization’s growth.

Another important election will occur once the new board is in place and that will be for two key IPI officer positions: the board chair-elect and the treasurer. With the chairman of the board and immediate past chair, these positions comprise the organization’s executive committee and are selected by the IPI board. As I see it, the executive committee’s role is to provide the central board leadership and interface with the IPI executive director to ensure that the organization stays on track, exploits new opportunities, and maximizes the impact of the entire board and volunteer committees. These duties are shared among the executive committee, so the composition of the committee and its chemistry matter greatly. The executive committee is often called upon to handle sensitive issues and consider matters prior to the full board’s deliberation. There must be a willingness among the committee to disagree, challenge one another and to offer new, creative thinking to the conversation. This group must be bold, visionary, thoughtful, selfless, and singularly focused on what is in IPI’s best interest.

Selecting the next chairman of the board and treasurer is of critical importance to IPI and I wish the candidates who will step forward all the best. Unfortunately for me, I’ll have to wait for the results to be revealed as CNN won’t be covering the deliberations on Election Day.

In Search of Utopia

Brett Wood

I just wrapped up major evaluation and documentation efforts on one of the coolest (and most challenging) projects I’ve done in a while. The City of Aurora, Colo., which has a population of more than 325,000 east of Denver, is largely a suburban-based community with no real parking vision—just a collection of strip malls, big box stores, and other suburban development. There is a large medical campus, but outside of that area, the urban context just doesn’t exist in Aurora. However, RTD (the regional transit provider) is on the cusp of opening a light rail line that will include nine stations in Aurora and connect the community with Denver and the airport. To say that things are about to change in Aurora would be an understatement.

That’s where our client comes in. The City of Aurora had the foresight to say, “we could have a parking problem.” But instead of waiting to see how that played out, they decided to get in front of the train (so to speak) and make sure they were ready. So for the past six months, we have been developing a business plan and a parking program from the ground up.

At our kickoff meeting, we joked the city had the opportunity to create Parking Utopia, where they learned from all the lessons of the many communities that have braved this transition before. Before long, what was a funny line became a mantra for the project.

We set out to create parking utopia, which, in our minds, was based on these tenets:

  • The community, including the customer and the economic vitality of the community, is the most important aspect of the program
  • It’s about so much more than parking; the system should be a conduit for improving mobility, access, and growth within the community
  • Enforcement should be based on compliance and education rather than heavy-handed regulations
  • Technologies should be designed to be easy to use for both the customer and the manager
  • The staff should be ambassadors for the program, helping the community learn about how and why we manage parking
  • The community should be engaged throughout the life of the program, helping define the future by providing existing feedback
  • Decisions should be made based on real data from the community, ensuring that new program elements meet the needs of those they serve
  • Parking should be priced to manage demand and promote community needs, not generate revenue
  • If they make positive revenue, it should be reinvested into the community.

I don’t know if you noticed a theme there, but it was all about the community. Utopia didn’t mean gadgets and gizmos or progressive policies. Rather, it meant creating a parking program that worked for Aurora and positioned them for success. So, with all of that said, what’s your ideal parking utopia?

To Go or Not To Go

MichelleJonesHS

I recently participated in a small long-weekend summit hosted by the Professional Convention Management Association. It was by invitation only and in a lovely destination. I took vacation days for Thursday and Friday, and the event concluded on Sunday. Only after I had made all of the arrangements for participation did I realize it fell on the same weekend as my only child’s senior prom. I know, I know. But I went anyway. I may not win Mother of the Year, but the event was worth it. Valuable education, priceless networking, and even a little R&R. The hubster did fine on his own picking up the flowers and taking photos. And the boy is not emotionally scarred.

Increasingly, we are all being asked to do more. It’s a challenge to be in several places at once. When I’m at work I worry about my family obligations. When I’m at home I worry about work. But sometimes we need to take a minute to recharge and do what’s best for us, in our personal and/or professional lives.

In just a few weeks, we will be in Las Vegas with industry colleagues, fabulous presenters, fun networking events, meaningful education, an impressive tradeshow, and maybe even a couple of hours poolside. You really don’t want to miss it.

If you have ever wanted to attend the IPI Conference & Expo but were too timid to ask your supervisor, fear not. Our website has a Justification Toolkit expressly for this purpose. We provide you with resources to explain the value of participation.

You may never need to take vacation days or miss your child’s milestones to participate in IPI, but it’s my hope that we provide you with fun, quality programming that would allow you to feel OK doing so.

Are We Prepared?

Dave Feehan

A survey in the Washington Business Journal asked readers if they were canceling planned trips to Baltimore as a result of recent demonstrations and riots. More than 60 percent said they would and another 20 percent said that while they would not cancel a planned trip, they would be more cautious. Baltimore isn’t the only city that has seen demonstrations and unrest. In fact, any city or suburb that experiences an incident of questionable police behavior this summer is almost certain to see some form of demonstration or protest.

Combine these human-related incidents with other factors—for example, the nearly unbelievable increase in the number of earthquakes in Oklahoma, prospects of increasingly severe weather, and an apparent increase in sinkholes—and suddenly, parking managers and operators need to ask themselves a few questions: Do we have an emergency preparedness plan, how good is it, when was it updated, and are we financially prepared for what could happen?  The IPI Safety & Security committee is developing Emergency Preparedness Guidelines just for this purpose.  This new resource will be invaluable to your operation, and available for download this summer.

I worked with the Golden Triangle Business Improvement District in downtown Washington D.C., a few years ago. I thought I had seen good emergency preparedness plans in other cities where I’ve worked, but this one was on a whole different plateau. Of course, the southern edge of this district has a unique architectural feature called the White House, so the Golden Triangle BID has to think about all kinds of terrorist threats as well. But anyone who thinks terrorism can’t strike in their town isn’t paying attention. Remember the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City?

Immediately after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, I called a hasty joint meeting with International Downtown Association members and members of BOMA, the Building Owners and Managers Association. We arranged a conference call with members in perhaps a dozen cities, and several people on the call expressed fears for their downtown skyscrapers. Not Minneapolis. The BOMA representative in Minneapolis said his greatest fear was an attack on the Mall of America, bookended by massive parking garages. A truck bomb in either one or both would be devastating.

Now would be a good time to review (or create) a robust emergency preparedness plan for your parking system. You may find that one possible danger isn’t physical, like a bomb, earthquake, hurricane, or tornado. It may simply be a major loss of revenue occurring when customers, out of fear, don’t show up.

Did You Hire Them or Create Them?

Mark D Napier

I have had the opportunity during my career to teach courses on management and leadership. Without exception, every time I teach a course, there will be one or more students who lament about the poor quality of his/her subordinates. The subordinates are generally long-term employees but occasionally are recent hires. The student wants to know how to “fix” the subordinates. Will training work? What about progressive discipline? Should I reassign him/her?

It is clear that when we find an employee who is not performing acceptably, we need to act to correct performance. After all, that is what some of us were hired to do. When I dig a little deeper, I find this is not an isolated incident of a few rogue employees, but an almost circular occurrence of one employee after another. This takes significant time from the supervisor and drains positive energy from a significant segment of the workforce. The supervisor may tell me success stories in which he/she was able to terminate or retrain a substandard employee. Affirmative action to correct performance is a good thing.

Unfortunately, we do not examine the most important issue: Did you hire a substandard employee or did you create one? Let me be clear, those are absolutely the only two possibilities. Failing to examine this reality is dooming the organization to perpetually revisiting the address of underperforming employees. We all want to believe that our hiring processes are sufficiently discriminating. If that is true (big if), we hired a person capable of acceptable performance. How then did we end up with this poor performing employee?

We must examine the culture of the organization, the effectiveness of supervision, and the merit of our evaluative processes to determine where they failed. If we did not create this substandard employee, then we hired him/her. We must examine the hiring processes and the pool of potential employees we draw from to determine how it failed to yield an acceptable employee.

When the fire department responds to a fire, they promptly put it out. Next, they try to determine what caused the fire so future events might be avoided. Your underperforming employee is analogous to the fire and you have to respond to it. Now, determine what caused the fire!

Rare Compliments

Kim_Fernandez_March2015

About a year ago, I sent a complimentary email about someone to his boss, thinking she should know about the great job he was doing. Several hours later, she wrote back, “Thank you for your note. We don’t often hear from people with good things to say.”

Tell me that doesn’t break your heart just a little bit. Maybe you’re nodding in agreement with her. We’re (the editorial “we,” of course, not you and me specifically) very quick to file complaints, verbally or in writing, when someone slips up on the job, but those nice notes? They seem to get lost in our mental shuffles. So much to do; so little time.

A friend told me a few weeks ago, “We live on compliments,” and I think it’s pretty spot-on, especially in an industry such as parking where the complaints and insults can fly a lot more frequently than the niceties. We all like hearing we’re doing a good job and most people don’t hear it often enough.

It’s Friday, and where I am, the sun is shining and the day feels full of potential. I’m issuing myself a challenge and I hope you’ll challenge yourself and your colleagues with me: For every complaint (maybe every two or three; we’ll be reasonable), give someone a compliment. Say something nice. Tell someone they’re doing a great job, in our out of your department. Tell someone who works for you, the barista who foams up your latte, the guy or girl who rings up your next cart of groceries, or even your spouse, significant other, kid, or neighbor. And then give yourself a pat on the back, because you just did a great thing yourself.

Famous, Fast, and Furious

Frank L. Giles

Who has two thumbs and operates a parking deck featured in the new “The Fast and the Furious” movie? This guy, that’s who! That’s right, I’m famous. Well, I run a famous parking deck, anyway.

Spoiler alert: If you haven’t seen it yet, the new “Furious 7” ends with the complete and utter destruction of a large urban parking deck. Not to worry—we have everything put back together now. Filming started before Paul Walker died and for a while there we didn’t know if the movie would make it to theaters at all, but it did. We were honored to be a part of it and a part of such a tribute to Mr. Walker.

The studio was able to do some amazing things with that parking deck, including put it in a totally different city and level it! Not that I’m biased, but I recommend this movie. Parking got one more day in Hollywood. Now, I’m not saying that I should receive an Oscar because one of my facilities was featured in one of the greatest action movie series of all time … it’s enough just to be nominated.

What is Your Vision for Parking Enforcement?

Mark D Napier

When considering the title question, I fear some of us (assuming a measure of honesty) are thinking, “To write more citations than last year to ensure an increase in revenue.” Really? If this is our enforcement vision, clearly stated or only inferred, how does this translate into a serious examination of our parking management success in terms of organizational goals and enforcement officer performance? Will this enforcement vision generate public support?

I introduce these questions to stimulate thought. Consider that in reality a continued increase in the number of citations we write is an indication of failure. If we can agree the purpose of enforcement is to change behavior and that enforcement should have an educational nexus, we then have to face the fact that increasing noncompliance is an indication that we are failing to deter and/or failing to educate. Another possibility is that our parking programs are so woefully inadequate or so poorly marketed as to nearly invite noncompliance. This, too, is not indicative of any parking management success.

Enforcement personnel who are primarily evaluated on the volume of citations they write will find violations. However, these may not be the violations we really should be pursuing and may be motivated by a need to produce some magic number of citations each day without respect to the merit of the presenting violation. The possibility for unethical behavior on the part of enforcement officers is a concern and, stated or not, this could be considered a quota. Finally, any vision of enforcement that is evenly subtlety predicated on a number of citations as a goal effectively feeds into the very stereotypes of our industry we seek to dispel.

Whether a campus or municipality, we must consider what our vision for parking enforcement is. We have to determine if that vision is in harmony with our larger organizational goals, if the vision provides positive guidance to enforcement personnel, and if that vision could stand the test of the light of day.