The Brain Surgeon on Your Team

Casey Jones 4x5 (2)

My consulting focus these days is on operational best practices for university parking and transportation departments. This differs from strategic planning in that the emphasis is placed on evaluating daily operations and making recommendations that improve operational efficiencies and program effectiveness. When I’m working with clients, we focus on the use of technology, enforcement climate, revenues and expenses, parking allocation systems, permit distribution, and organizational structure. I’ve discovered a common trend in organizational structure that often distinguishes aspiring programs from those that consistently perform at a high level.

There are countless ways to structure a parking and transportation department. Some programs are aligned along an inside-outside model in which office activities are managed by one leader and while someone else manages field work. Some programs separate parking and transportation or alternatives to driving, while others align all program groups under one director. None of these are necessarily bad, but the best programs include key skill sets; those that don’t have them are challenged to make real progress. Two areas I advise my clients to add if they don’t already have them are information technology (IT) and transportation demand management (TDM). Changes in the use of technology and our growing need to offer alternatives to driving make the addition of these specialties a necessity.

Comparing professionals experienced in the use of parking technology or moving people from single-occupancy vehicles to alternative forms of transportation with industry generalists is like pitting brain or orthopedic surgeons against general-practice physicians. We need leaders with broad experience to be sure, but the demands placed on our IT systems and the skills required to effectively promote van pool, rideshare, and transit use require program specialists.

One needs to look no further than to programs such as those at the University of Washington, Texas A&M, or Colorado State University to see what’s possible with the right team of skills and experience. It hasn’t been by luck alone that these programs have flourished. Instead, leaders there have built their programs around highly skilled specialists in areas of strategic importance.

Can EMV Protect us from Cybercriminals?

Bruce Barclay

By now, we have all heard of the upcoming transition to “smart chip” technology for credit cards. The U.S. is one of the last countries to move to EMV chip technology–we are in year two of a four-year plan for the migration, with a target date of October 2015 for card issuers and merchants to complete their implementation of EMV chip cards, terminals, and processing systems.

The migration cannot come soon enough for many consumers. Consider the Target breach from November/December 2013. Target said the attackers gained access to customer names, credit card/debit numbers, expiration dates, and CVV security codes. The Wall Street Journal reported the thieves accessed the data from the magnetic stripes on the back of credit and debit cards. Would this have been the case if the U.S. was already using chip technology?  Experts say no.

At a recent Congressional Subcommittee hearing, Randy Vanderhoof, executive director of the Smart Card Alliance, testified about cybercrime in the U.S. In 2013, data breaches became more damaging, with one in three people receiving a data breach notification letter. This is up from one in four during 2012. The increase in cybercrime against retailers is partly due to the fact that magnetic stripe card information is valuable to hackers.

The black market price for several million card accounts stolen from the Target breach was between $26.60 and $44.80 each prior to December 19, 2013. EMV chip cards can reduce financial cybercrime by removing the economic incentive for criminals. Once we replace magnetic stripe cards with EMV chip cards, the risks of duplicated data and counterfeit credit cards will become a thing of the past.

IPI’s webinar, EMV and its Effect on the Parking Industry, will take place today at 2:00 p.m. EST. Sign up and plan to take part. Click here to read Vanderhoof’s testimony.

 

 

The Solar Parking Lot

Isaiah Mouw

The Wright Brothers started in a garage. Amazon started in a garage. Hewlett Packard and Disney both started in garages. Mattel started in a garage. The Ramones started in a garage. And the world’s first solar roadway started in a… parking lot. The Solar Roadways team just finished up the world’s first solar parking lot.

Scott and Julie Brusaw stand beside the Solar Roadways prototype parking lot

Scott and Julie Brusaw stand beside the Solar Roadways prototype parking lot

You might remember Scott and Julie Brusaw from their presentation at the 2013 IPI Conference &Expo or the feature in the February 2013 issue of The Parking Professional. They told us of their dreams to pave the world’s highways with high-tech solar panel roadways. Their purpose is to replace our nation’s deteriorating highway infrastructure and crumbling power grid with an intelligent highway system that pays for itself through the generation of electricity and doubles as an intelligent, self-healing, decentralized power grid. With the completion of this parking lot, they are one step closer to their dream.

“One of the biggest challenges of this phase was to explore and test various glass surfaces and textures and test them for strength, traction, and durability and all test results have exceeded our expectations. In addition to the solar cells, the panels contain heaters to keep them snow and ice free and LED lights for road lines and verbiage”, says Scott Brusaw. You can check out the pictures of the prototype parking lot here.

The parking industry can once again lead the way by donating to Solar Roadways’ Indiegogo crowdsource fundraising campaign which goes live on Earth Day (April 22). They plan to raise funds to be used to hire a team, plan for production and gear up for manufacturing, one parking lot at a time. It’s a fascinating project, and I’ll report back as new developments arise.

One Size Fits All?

Dave Feehan

My wife and I just returned from a vacation in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We parked in the daily garage at Dulles International Airport, and I happened to notice the growing number of very small cars in the facility–Smarts, Fiat 500s, Kia Souls, Minis, and many others. One Smart was parked next to a mammoth Suburban, and had we been looking for a spot, I’m sure we would have mistaken the Smart’s space as vacant until we started to turn in and found a very small vehicle in the 20-foot stall.

According to one city’s municipal code, “The minimum size of a standard parking space shall be nine feet wide and 18 feet long. Parking spaces within enclosed garages shall have an interior dimension of at least 10 feet wide and 20 feet long. The minimum size of a compact parking space shall be eight feet wide and 16 feet long.”

What’s a parking operator to do? Sales of subcompacts have more than doubled in the last couple of years, and given other trends in society, we can expect that more people– especially young people–will buy and drive small, fuel-efficient vehicles, to say nothing of motorcycles and bikes. How do we accommodate all of these vehicles while keeping our customers happy?

Restriping is expensive and can be problematic. Sometimes the old stripes are still visible and confuse parkers. Does a Smart need the same amount of space as a Suburban? Obviously not. You could stack two Smarts in a typical space. And to make matters even more complicated, I drive a Chevy Volt plug-in hybrid and need spaces with charging equipment. Lots more bikes, motorbikes, motor scooters, and motorcycles are looking for parking spaces. Pass the Rolaids, please. Things are going to be messy for a while.

Mobility as Service

L. Dennis Burns

I recently embarked on a new area of research: multi-modal mobility as a service (as opposed to a product one might own). This brings together many elements from the fields of transportation and mobility, emerging technologies, environmental sustainability, changing demographic trends, and communications advancements. It is related to the concept of the connected traveler in that it embraces and leverages our new abilities to easily access a range of combined mobility services via smartphones and, increasingly, vehicles and other devices. Integrated mobility services offer new and easy ways to access options that can be tailored to better meet customer needs and address a range of issues related to the fact that soon, nearly two-thirds of the world’s population will live in megacities.

The future of urban public transportation lies in mobility systems that provide bicycles, cars, and other transportation modes on demand. Most mobility assets will be shared instead of owned by users–a phenomenon known as shared-use mobility. Convenient and reliable lifestyle and mobility services will be offered to connected citizens who will be able to easily access them via their smartphones. These services will become viable alternatives to car ownership, as they are more tailored to customer needs and will ultimately be more cost effective and environmentally sustainable, and reflect the lifestyle choices of a new generation.

Combined mobility services take the concept of shared-use to a new level, recognizing that desires for flexibility and efficiency are further advanced when shared-mobility solutions can be offered in an integrated platform. For service providers making the transition to combined mobility services, these developments offer a real opportunity to deliver sustainable growth during the next decades.

Many of these new services are delivered as apps that connect the different participants. For example, Washington, D.C.-based RideScout integrates data from a host of different providers, including those offering carshare, bikeshare, fixed-route transit, and ride services.

Another intriguing model is Zappos’ Project 100, which aims to create a seamless network of 100 on-demand chauffeured Tesla sedans, 100 shared vehicles, 100 shared bikes, and 100 shared shuttle bus stops that a phone app optimally assigns to each subscriber who inputs a destination. This mixed-mode concierge service could be the next level of the concept of mobility as a service.

The parking industry has much to contribute to this new mobility future. After all, shared use is already an emerging trend within our industry. I am in the process of developing several new concepts for existing clients who are ready to take the next step toward combined mobility. I encourage you to learn more about this exciting area. Together, we can help develop strategies that will allow the parking profession to be a creative force for applying combined mobility solutions for the future. I hope you will join me for the ride!

 

The Changing Face (and Terminology) of British Parking

Christina Onesirosan Martinez

As I sat down at the annual British Parking Awards in London (UK) last month, one particular category caught my attention: The Front Line Award.

The organizers announced that the new category was created to reflect the unfortunate hostile climate faced by those working on the ground in the parking industry in the UK.

The reason this category especially stuck in my mind was that I have closely followed changes in the terminology used to describe parking attendants. For many years, they were called traffic wardens and the general public seemed to accept that while they would also issue parking fines, their main role was to keep traffic moving in the city.  Was it no coincidence that at the same time that their name changed to civil enforcement officers, the public began to see them as confrontational? Soon after their title change, the British public realized that they now had the power to issue large fines for parking. This, I think is where the aggression began.

This new award certainly seems to support this theory, as does the winner’s job title: Jade Glover is a hate crime ambassador for APCOA Parking.  Sadly, part of her daily routine now includes carrying a DNA swab kit in a bid to prosecute more common and aggravated assaults.

In the event Jade is assaulted, she can use one or more dry swabs to extract saliva from her skin or uniform and report her attack to the local police.  This can then be matched against 6 million records in the national DNA database.

How sad that someone who is dedicated to making our streets less congested now resembles an extra from CSI. What do you make of it? I look forward to reading your comments below.

 

 

 

Property Owners Asked: How Safe Is Your Parking Lot?

Mark Wright

Does a nose-in parking configuration present safety risks? Are wheel stops enough to keep a vehicle from crashing forward into a building? How might demographics help influence parking lot safety planning?

These are just some of the questions that have been posed to commercial real estate development professionals in an online discussion via LinkedIn. The discussion comes on the heels of an article NAIOP (the commercial real estate development association) asked me to write for Development Magazine about vehicle-into-building crashes.

With the help of co-author Rob Reiter, the piece helps shine a spotlight on parking lot safety in general, with particular attention to what can happen around the edges — in the space where parking areas and buildings meet.

IPI has been wonderful about helping educate its members about these issues. The LinkedIn discussion this week offers a great opportunity to extend parking professionals’ perspectives and expertise to an audience for which parking — especially parking-related safety — is not always top-of-mind. (I think of it as cross-pollinating great ideas!)

As a fellow IPI member, I invite you to add your voice to this important discussion. Join the NAIOP LinkedIn group and give property owners, developers, and managers the benefit of your parking knowledge.

 

Could I Live in a Parking Space?

Frank L. Giles

Today’s big cities are more congested than ever, and it’s not just the traffic and parking that are in high demand: living space is at a premium as well. For every car on the road, there has to be a place to park. The same is true for people.

What if we could live in the same-size space our cars do? Could you live in a parking space? The students at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) asked that question and through a massive amount of collaborative ingenuity and creativity, the answer seems to be yes.

The average parking space is about 9 by 15 feet, give or take. The students at SCAD have undertaken the task of transforming spaces at their Atlanta campus parking deck into livable micro housing units, each complete with a kitchen, sleeping area, bathroom, and shower. These micro units, called “SCAD Pads,” are due to be occupied by selected SCAD students this April. The students will log their daily living experience using social media.

If this concept takes hold, you may one day ponder living in one of the spaces you manage. So what do you think: could you live in a parking space? Let us know in the comments.

 

 

Lending a Hand to Help a Peer–and the Profession

Shawn Conrad

One of the best things about being part of IPI’s wonderfully generous community is the sharing of information and learning from fellow parking professionals.

IPI recently collaborated with David McKinney, director of parking services at Arkansas State University. David is working on his doctoral dissertation on various management practices at universities and colleges. His work will be valuable to our industry and to support his efforts we asked IPI members to respond to David’s survey.

WOW did you respond! Within a short period of time after our request, David received a treasure trove of responses from his peers at academic institutions across North America and was the envy of his colleagues who commiserate about how difficult it is to get responses. (An aside: Kate Windom, our education researcher who conducted IPI’s Jobs Analysis Survey last year, was similarly bowled over by the level of response from our members.)

Once completed, David will share the results of his survey with IPI and we will share it with you. It’s a real win-win for everyone!

In the future, we’d like to help others with a quest to do academic-reviewed research for the parking industry. I know how easy it is to become survey-weary, but I hope you will continue to consider your participation an investment in advancing the parking profession and making an important contribution. It is appreciated very much. Onward, and thank you!

Investing In Parking

L. Dennis Burns

A recent project asked that we evaluate trends in the parking industry. One of the specific areas of focus was parking technology.

IPI released a very nice piece last year, 2013 Emerging Trends in Parking, based on a survey of its members. Two of the top trends noted in the report were the rapidly-expanding use of smartphones and mobile apps as both a means of pushing out information about parking and as payment options.

The report said, “Topping the list of trends in the $30 billion parking industry is the ‘move toward innovative technologies to improve parking access control and payment automation,’ cited by 59 percent of respondents. Another top trend is ‘real-time communication of pricing and availability to mobile/smartphones.’”

The second major trend related directly to the expansion of payment options:

“The second leading trend is the ‘demand for electronic (cashless) payment,’ with cities such as Washington, D.C., Pittsburgh, Houston, and Miami among others, incorporating pay-by-phone programs. Acclaimed as the world’s most successful of its type, the D.C. program has earned 550,000 customers and accounts for 40 percent of the city’s parking revenues. About 80 percent of the seven million transactions to date employ smart phones, with payment options that include credit cards, an online and mobile money management solution, and PayPal.”

As we began our own investigation of industry trends, a friend shared an interesting fact with me” Almost $25 million in funding has been invested in parking-focused mobile payment firms during the past 12 months:

  • Passport – $6M (December 2013)
  • Pango 6.5M (February 2014)
  • QuickPay – $5.5M (February 2014)
  • ParkMobile – $6.3M (February 2013)

These facts, combined with other significant investments by major multi-national corporations such as Xerox, 3M, etc., reinforce the fact that the importance of parking is being recognized on a broader scale than ever before.

This speaks volumes about the advancement of the parking profession and underscores the critical role parking plays in community and economic development, the importance of parking planning, the evolution of a more sustainable transportation industry, and ultimately our ability to directly enhance the parking experience of millions of parking patrons every day. It’s an exciting time to be a parking professional!