About Christina Onesirosan Martinez

Christina Onesirosan Martinez, MBA MCIM, is marketing director at Parkopedia, where she is responsible for the company's global marketing operations. She serves on IPI's International Outreach Committee.

The Changing Face (and Terminology) of British Parking

Christina Onesirosan Martinez

As I sat down at the annual British Parking Awards in London (UK) last month, one particular category caught my attention: The Front Line Award.

The organizers announced that the new category was created to reflect the unfortunate hostile climate faced by those working on the ground in the parking industry in the UK.

The reason this category especially stuck in my mind was that I have closely followed changes in the terminology used to describe parking attendants. For many years, they were called traffic wardens and the general public seemed to accept that while they would also issue parking fines, their main role was to keep traffic moving in the city.  Was it no coincidence that at the same time that their name changed to civil enforcement officers, the public began to see them as confrontational? Soon after their title change, the British public realized that they now had the power to issue large fines for parking. This, I think is where the aggression began.

This new award certainly seems to support this theory, as does the winner’s job title: Jade Glover is a hate crime ambassador for APCOA Parking.  Sadly, part of her daily routine now includes carrying a DNA swab kit in a bid to prosecute more common and aggravated assaults.

In the event Jade is assaulted, she can use one or more dry swabs to extract saliva from her skin or uniform and report her attack to the local police.  This can then be matched against 6 million records in the national DNA database.

How sad that someone who is dedicated to making our streets less congested now resembles an extra from CSI. What do you make of it? I look forward to reading your comments below.

 

 

 

Parking in the Middle

Christina Onesirosan Martinez

The girl from Ipanema goes parking!

On a cold and wet night a few weeks ago, I made my way to London’s Heathrow Airport to board a flight to São Paulo, Brazil for Expo Parking, organized in cooperation with Abrapark (the Brazilian Parking Association) and IPI.

I 100 percent admit that I was expecting it to be a very slow four days on the expo floor . How wrong I was! The story is in the numbers: thousands of feet of exhibition space, 100 exhibitors, and crowds of industry attendees.

The first thing that hit me upon landing in São Paulo was the sheer volume of cars on the road, and that this congestion lasts all day, every day. A short journey from Sao Paulo International Airport to my hotel should have taken 20 minutes; two and a half hours later, I was still stuck in traffic.

The main problem is that Brazil’s roads are not built for its current car ownership boom. In 2012, the number of cars on the road rose to a staggering 42.2 million. Unfortunately (or fortunately depending who you ask), present-day public transport is not a viable option.

These two problem areas formed the basis for discussions at the Third Brazilian Parking Conference, held during Expo Parking 2013 in São Paulo last month. The conference, organized by Abrapark, focused on urban mobility, and of course, parking was high on the agenda. The age old chicken-egg scenario was debated at length: do parking lots encourage car use? Needless to say, we did not reach a definitive conclusion.

After a few days of meetings and talking to people on the show floor, it soon became apparent that urban development is at the top of everyone’s agenda in both government and business circles. What I hadn’t realized was that parking is seen as an important ally in this development.

As of 2012, Brazil had 34 international airports, 458 shopping centers, and 661 sports stadiums and that number is on the increase–as is the number of parking spots needed! It was nice to see parking taking an advisory role in the quest to figure out what to do with all those cars.

 

The New Kid at the Auto Show

Christina Onesirosan Martinez

“You are going where?”

“The LA Auto Show.”

“But I thought you worked in parking.”

“ I do.”

So went a recent conversation with a friend who, coincidentally, used to design booths for auto shows.  He couldn’t believe there would be any interest in parking at the big one in Los Angeles. My response to him was to evoke a famous Bob Dylan track: The Times They Are a-Changin’.

One of the major trends for 2013 has been the connected car. Parking seems to not only fit extremely well into this trend, but is establishing itself as one of the essential elements.

We saw a glimpse of this back in September at the Frankfurt Auto Show, where European automakers showcased their leading technology. You guessed it, parking was there!

At the LA Auto Show, it became very clear that the automotive world sees parking as a very logical addition to navigation systems, and that these systems are fast gaining momentum toward being a standard in-car feature.

As Paul Asel, managing partner of Nokia Growth Partners, commented, “New auto technologies adopted in the next few years have the potential to alter our driving experience more than at any time in the past 50 years. The LA Auto Show offered a glimpse of what the next few years may offer. Much more is yet to come.”

Whether you operate a parking lot, provide parking information through a website or app, or manage payments and/or reservations, the auto world is ready to knock on your door.

 

Real-Time Pricing in the Real World

Christina Onesirosan Martinez

The last few years have seen a real explosion in terms of the number of people using mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. As we know, the mobile industry is a fascinating, fast-paced environment where technologies, devices, and companies change every day.

Love them, or hate them, mobile devices are here to stay. So, as is the case with your mother-in-law, you just have to get on with it and embrace them.

It is crucial for parking operators to keep pricing information as up to date as possible because like it or not, many drivers make decisions based on price, and there is nothing worse than arriving at your chosen destination and realizing that the space will now cost you more.

Many of you will scream, “No, constant price changes are not convenient for the driver! They create confusion!” Some of you will be in agreement that dynamic pricing allows for better yield management, which in turn optimizes revenue.

Those in the “green” corner have realized that up-to-date pricing achieves the goal of opening up spaces, reducing unnecessary driving around. This has been seen in San Francisco, where intentionally raised on-street prices (on high-demand blocks) are steering drivers to park on another street or in a neighboring parking lot, opening up prime street spots.

Still not convinced? I’ll leave you with a story that illustrates the value of distributing real-time information about parking pricing:

The operator of a parking lot at a railway station recently agreed to a price change whereby drivers leaving their cars at the station parking lot and continuing their journey by train were entitled to a discount of nearly 50 percent on the posted daily parking rate. All they had to do was purchase the ticket at the counter instead of at the payment machine or online. But this information wasn’t conveyed to customers in real time (as it would be via mobile), and 99 percent of the drivers there didn’t know about it.

The operator is still receiving complaints three weeks later.