New British Proposals Affect Parking

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As you enjoy  your summer holiday, you are (wisely) probably not thinking too much about the challenge of the British government’s proposals on local authority parking, which they published in late June. But I’m afraid those days of sun and sea will soon pass and our focus will be back on the job!

Following significant lobbying by the British Parking Association (BPA) and other organizations, including the Local Government Associations and London Councils as well as individual local authorities, we succeeded in persuading the government that banning closed-circuit television (CCTV) in its entirety was throwing the baby out with the bathwater.  At least the Transport Minister saw sense and has ensured, in the publication of his response to the consultation, that he intends to permit CCTV to continue to be used, but only in specific circumstances of his choosing.

The BPA will lobby on our members’ behalf to ensure that CCTV can continue to be used in the circumstances for which it was intended, namely to relieve congestion on our streets and improve road safety.  We will be working over the summer with members of the House of Lords as the Deregulation Bill, which the government amended in June, makes its way through the Lords on its way to Royal Assent, probably at the end of the year.

There are many uncertainties at present around how the government’s proposals will turn out, and there are a number of opportunities to improve the position from the perspective of local authorities and the wider parking profession, at the same time ensuring that we place the consumer at the heart of our thinking.

The most extraordinary outcome from the government’s published response is that the responsibilities for implementing these changes are shared between the Department for Transport and the Department for Communities and Local Government.  When a government is at loggerheads with itself, organizations such as the BPA must redouble their efforts to deal with two sets of officials and two sets of Ministers.

I do hope that the government is united in developing these proposals as fractures within the policy- and law-making organizations does not make for good legislation, and, as we know, in other circumstances bad legislation can make life very difficult for those who have to implement and enforce it.

I hop you will put in your diary the date of our Annual Conference in October, where we will have very interesting and, I hope, constructive debates about where we have been on this subject and where we are going in the future.

Personal Freedoms vs. Public Ideals

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I was talking with a friend who is a London bus driver the other day.

He was saying how important bus lane and parking enforcement were in his job and how grateful he was that local authorities take their enforcement responsibilities seriously enough to ensure that people don’t park their cars obstructing the bus. He said nothing frustrated him more than “selfish” (his word) drivers stopping in bus stops or bus lanes or on narrow corners.

I saw him again a couple of weeks later and he told me he received a parking ticket (on his own car) for stopping briefly on a yellow line. He was as cross about getting the parking ticket as he was about other drivers blocking the passage of his bus.

I tell this story because it nicely illustrates the dichotomy that many of our members face on a regular basis. We all think reducing congestion, improving road safety, and encouraging and helping buses are good things–it would be difficult not to. But we’re not happy if our personal freedoms are curtailed in the pursuit of these ideals.

The British government’s consultation–the responses to which are now being sifted through by Department for Transportation (DfT) civil servants – didn’t take account of the importance of good parking management to these objectives around congestion and road safety. The British Parking Association (BPA) has been reminding government of why good parking management exists and that we should be careful what we ask for when we fail to take account of these wider ideals.

The government’s own report says that traffic in the UK will increase on our roads by 43 percent by 2040. Local authorities will need the tools to deal with the clear threat to congestion and road safety which this growth will create. This is not a good time to be making it more difficult for authorities to address that task.

 

British Parking Challenges Continue

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There’s been no let up in the British government’s and member of Parliaments’ fixation with the parking sector.Car_BritFlag__163052918

Following various statements from Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Eric Pickles and his new High Streets Minister Brandon Lewis about the impact of parking on the shopping centers of our towns and cities, the House of Commons’ Transport Select Committee published its report in October.

I found the report a little lackluster to be honest, not really tackling the issues on which it received evidence and concluding somewhat meekly that government should do something about the perception that councils are using their parking enforcement powers to generate revenue.

There were some useful recommendations around the need for government to tackle foreign registered vehicles, to arbitrate on the conflict between the needs of the freight industry and the wider road using the public, and it stopped short of recommending that mobile closed-circuit television (CCTV) used for parking enforcement should be banned–something the communities and local government department has advocated.

But the way forward on these issues is at best muddled. Government will respond (probably early next year) to the Select Committee’s report. In the meanwhile the British Parking Association (BPA) has called for and is organizing a summit to try to drive some leadership into the debate so we can all better understand what it is that needs to be done to restore public confidence in local authority parking management and to set out the local authority case for properly and legitimately managing traffic and parking in their communities. Transport Minister Robert Goodwill (who replaced Norman Baker) has already agreed to attend.

The time is fast approaching when these particular chickens will come home to roost and local authority traffic and parking departments need to be part of the solution. So I wish you all a very happy holiday and ask you to prepare for resolution in the new year to get this sorted once and for all.