Are You Ready to “Ignite” and Inspire?

Henry Wallmeyer

“The facilitators did an excellent job of presenting the material.”

“Excellent presentation!”

“Great overview and inspiration.”

“Good information. Fun Time”

“He’s a very knowledgeable presenter with a lot of good relevant experience.”

“This was the best class yet!!”

“This is the best presentation I have been to, maybe ever!”

This is just a sampling of what attendees told us about the sessions and speakers at the 2013 IPI Conference & Expo in Fort Lauderdale. Wouldn’t you like the above to be said about you? It can!

To receive these and perhaps even greater compliments, submit your idea for a presentation and become a speaker at the 2014 IPI Conference & Expo in Dallas, June 1-4. If you are an experienced and articulate individual willing to share your expertise and real-world practices, it’s easy to submit a presentation proposal—we especially want those that illustrate case studies, illuminate important issues, demonstrate how-to knowledge, and increase the professionalism of attendees.

We introduced the Ignite: Parking session in Fort Lauderdale: eight individuals presented for five minutes each using 20 slides that automatically advanced every 15 seconds. Because of the packed room and immensely positive feedback, we are expanding to three sessions in 2014: Ignite: Technology, Ignite: Sustainability, and Ignite: Parking.

An Ignite session is a unique opportunity for you to deliver valuable information in a fun and entertaining way, and we’re looking for engaging, high-energy, multi-tasking, industry professionals to lead the way.

Whether you shine in a traditional 60-minute session or an Ignite session, being a speaker at the IPI Conference & Expo can be an extremely rewarding experience, both personally and professionally. Click here for more information and to submit your presentation.

We look forward to receiving your submission by the October 1, 2013 deadline.

Solar Roadways Make Headlines

Isaiah Mouw

Remember Solar Roadways from the general session presentation at the 2013 IPI Conference and Expo in Ft. Lauderdale? Scott and Julie Brusaw, inventors and co-founders of Solar Roadways, introduced their concept of solar road panels and what they can do for the parking industry and the world (click here to read the feature about their project in The Parking Professional). If you had the opportunity to sit in on the presentation, you witnessed something special. And now, the little company with big aspirations is moving closer to fulfilling those aspirations.

Just this week the Brusaws announced on their Facebook page that they were “chosen by our peers as a finalist in the World Technology Awards in the category of Energy. We are amazed to find ourselves in the company of so many remarkable people. Some of the other finalists in various categories include: Mark Zuckerberg, Sal Khan, Andreessen Horowitz, Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen, Bill and Melinda Gates and Elon Musk. The winners will be announced at a ceremony in N.Y. in November. Our selection as finalists means that we are now Fellows of the World Technology Network. What an honor!”

There’s more news, too: Solar Roadways’ short documentary directed by Michele Ohayon, which was shown at the 2013 IPI Conference & Expo, will be featured at the Big Eddy film festival in New York on September 21. You might even be on a date with your significant other and have this short documentary shown at the movie theatre before your movie starts. That’s because thanks to a partnership with Spotlight Cinema Network, the Solar Roadways documentary will screen before features at all Regency and Landmark Theatres between August 23 and September 19.

The Brusaws hope to pave the world with solar panel roadways, but it all begins with a parking lot. It’s pretty cool that we all saw the inception of this movement. What can parking professionals do to support their work? You can help spread the word on social media. I am a big fan of TED Talks and think that Scott Brusaw would make an excellent TED speaker. You can nominate him here as a TED Speaker. I think it would speak volumes if parking professionals helped get him chosen, to help further their message and concept of Solar Roadways.

There’s more ahead for solar roads and parking lots. Stay tuned!

Extra, Extra, Read All About It

Helen Sullivan

“Extra, extra, read all about it,” was the cry of newsboys on the street hawking special editions of newspapers to passers-by back shutterstock_104688506Extra Extra Newswhen that was the main way we got our news. The media, in all its forms, is still one of the best ways to get the word out.

Each year, we leverage the IPI Conference & Expo as an opportunity to remind the media that there is a great deal that is newsworthy about the parking industry.  IPI’s Parking Matters® program is focused at the conference and year-round on generically promoting the parking industry and the value of parking expertise in the early planning stages of projects.

Airing last night at 10 p.m. ET in 96 million US households was the first of a three-part series on the Travel Channel called “Extreme Parking.” If you were at the opening session of the IPI Conference & Expo in Fort Lauderdale last week, you previewed a rough cut of the third segment that focuses on the future of parking. This is a knock-your-socks-off, hats-off to the parking industry that you are going to love!

Casey Jones, CAPP, IPI immediate past chair and spokesperson extraordinaire, is prominently featured and narrates large segments of the episode. John Schmid, chairman of the board of the Green Parking Council (now an affiliate of IPI), is also interviewed about Canopy Airport Parking, which was a 2012 IPI Awards of Excellence winner (see the July 2012 issue of The Parking Professional for more).

Another great success is the report, “Parking Industry Tries to Make Your Life Easier,” that aired this week on 600 National Public Radio (NPR) stations coast-to-coast. The story is the result of our invitation to Miami-based NPR reporter Kenny Malone and the Miami Herald. Malone devoted serious time to listening and learning. He came to the conference Monday, and came back for more, spending time in the Tuesday general session, walking the Expo hall floor, and interviewing quite a few IPI members. He left our conference with a whole new view of our industry–a positive view. I hope you’ll take the time to listen to his story.

Reporter Angel Streeter, with the Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel also covered the conference with an article focused on technology and sustainability.

Chris Woodyard, blogging for USA Today’s Drive On, reported on the Emerging Trends in Parking Survey, which featured a section on the top cities identified by parking industry respondents as being among the most innovative and trend setting when it comes to parking. Read the blog here.

Post-conference media coverage is still rolling in, such as this piece that appeared in the Denver Tribune.

There was a time when nearly all media coverage about parking was negative. It’s “extra” gratifying to see the parking industry increasingly reported about in the positive light it so deserves.

 

Game Changers

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Another busy day at the IPI Conference & Expo gave attendees a glimpse into the future of parking, an afternoon of business on the _EST1799Expo floor, educational sessions, and plenty of opportunity to network, network, network.

The morning kicked off with the 2013 IPI Awards of Excellence presentation, where outstanding parking facilities and operations were honored and applauded (see more on this in the June issue of The Parking Professional, arriving in your mailbox soon). This year’s awardees included garages that showcase innovative design, out-of-the-box thinking, and sustainable solutions that make sense, along with operations that have overcome tremendous challenges to serve their communities and keep people moving.

The room went silent after that as attendees were held rapt by Mary Smith of Walker Parking Consultants, a top expert on parking and transportation, who talked about “Game Changers.”

“Parking has changed more in the past 10 years than in my previous 28 in the industry,” she said, attributing that to changing trends in car ownership rates, growing cities, and other factors. She pointed out reasons why parking is not, as some believe, the root of urban sprawl issues, and said that while efforts to change the perception of parking through alternate uses can be good, they’re not always executed in the wisest fashion.

_EST1882Downtown garages that lease their spaces out for weddings and other events, she said, are “touted as great shared use, but it’s not appropriate to take spaces out of use for parking when they’re needed most.” Instead, uses such as farm markets during the day (when spaces aren’t in as much demand by restaurants and other businesses, can be a better use.

Smith spent some time talking about “peak cars,” which is a peak in vehicle ownership forecast to happen in the next several years, as millennial generation members (born after 1980) eschew individual car ownership in favor of car share programs and public transportation. She also talked about the next generations of technology for cars, including compressed natural gas (CNG) and driverless cars, including some that may fly.

Following her presentation, attendees enjoyed an afternoon networking and exploring new products, services, and technologies on the Expo hall floor, attending educational sessions in five tracks, and exchanging business cards, handshakes, and conversation in the halls of the convention center.

The IPI Conference & Expo wraps up today with the final Expo hours, a lunchtime presentation by marketing expert Bill Smith, and the closing event that’s sure to be fast-paced and thrilling!

 

IPI Conference & Expo Kicks Off

Kim Fernandez

Record numbers of parking professionals have made the most of their time at the IPI Conference & Expo in Fort Lauderdale, _EST1388
Florida, taking in educational sessions, doing business on the Expo hall floor, and having fun with friends around town.

Day one kicked off Sunday with the first round of education–sessions are organized into five distinct tracks–and the opening event at the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Science and Discovery, where attendees mingled among fascinating and fun interactive exhibits. Also popular was the first Poster Session on the third floor of the convention center, where exhibits on parking projects and innovations offered information in a new format–this continues throughout the conference just outside the education session rooms.

Yesterday started with a touching awards ceremony that honored top professionals in the IPI Professional Recognition Program. A highlight was the presentation of the newly-named James M. Hunnicutt, CAPP, Parking Professional of the Year award by two of the late association founder’s daughters to Roamy Valera, CAPP. (see the July issue of The Parking Professional for more–coming soon!).

_EST0991Following awards, speaker Scott Brusaw took the stage to talk about his Solar Roadways project, which has the potential to replace asphalt and concrete on parking lots, sidewalks, and roads with LED-equipped solar panels, generating power for businesses and communities, electric vehicle charging, and variable lighting that can be configured for lines, messages, and even instant warnings that something’s on the surface up ahead (read The Parking Professional’s cover story on Solar Roadways here). Able to melt snow and ice before they have a chance to accumulate on roads or parking lots, Solar Roadways has attracted the attention of government agencies, large companies, and parking professionals.

The concept was clearly popular with attendees, many of whom visited with Brusaw and his wife and co-inventor, Julie, at the Expo, where a piece of solar road sparked a lot of conversation.

More excitement awaits today, with a presentation by Mary Smith, Walker Parking Consultants, about the future of parking, the 2013 IPI Awards of Excellence, education sessions that include IPI’s first IGNITE session–five minutes and 20 slides for each energizing speaker–and more Expo hours and PowerPitch forums on the floor. It’s going to be a great day in Florida!

 

Stockings Hung By the Chimney With Care

Bonnie Watts

Today is a day of excitement and anticipation and nervous energy around the IPI office. It reminds me of the role of parent on Christmas, actually. The months of shopping, the dreaded Black Friday chaos, decorating the house, finding that perfect gift for loved ones, baking and preparing for the family feasts, putting together toys to surprise little ones under the tree, and then hanging the stockings by the chimney with care in eager anticipation. That’s how I feel today. As our Conference planning team reviews the event agenda one more time and we double-check our boarding passes and flight times en route to Fort Lauderdale, I am reminded of all the fabulous surprises in store for our attendees and exhibitors. From power-packed educational content to illuminating keynote speakers, to our condensed CAPP Five-Day certification course, to the jam-packed exhibit hall (literally–we couldn’t find a spot for another exhibitor if we had to), to the first time ever Poster Session gallery, to the fun, interactive, and outside-the-box social events, this year’s IPI Conference & Expo promises that attendees will walk away with memories, education, and new friendships and partnerships that will shape their careers–the gift that keeps on giving.

Our pre-registration numbers are the highest ever and this is likely to be a record-breaking turnout this year with more than 2,500 attendees. I feel like it’s Christmas Eve. Your stocking has been hung by the chimney with care. We can’t wait to see you enjoy everything we have in store.

I’ll see you in Fort Lauderdale with your gifts waiting for you!

P.S. If you haven’t registered, it’s still not too late to join us. We’re expecting record-breaking crowds, but you can register onsite. Visit IPIConference.parking.org for more information.

 

ADA Compliance Standards in Higher Education

Trussell-Mohlerphoto

I feel as if I have spent a lifetime working in higher education, specifically in the parking industry! After almost 14 years, I’ve learned that nothing ever stays the same, and you always have to be on your toes, staying on top of the latest developments. that’s particularly true in the area of ADA compliance. Policy regarding ADA compliance as it relates to parking is constantly being updated, and it’s our responsibility as parking professionals to be aware of these changes and implement those necessary to ensure compliance.

Ohio University is situated on beautiful rolling hills and the campus intermingles with the City of Athens. The campus is very much a walking campus supported by transit provided by the city and the university.  Lack of parking at many buildings requires the use of Campus Area Transit Cutting Across Boundaries (CATCAB), a service for individuals with mobility limitations, by many individuals with disabilities. One area  behind a classroom building was designated as disability parking, as it provided those with disabilities access to this classroom and the library. There are no other parking options in this area, so we felt we were providing the best parking options available given the area and what we had to work with.

Unfortunately, a pedestrian (who was texting and walking) was struck by a vehicle in this area. This led to the removal of the spaces behind the building. A student with a disability permit who parked in this area every day was quite upset about the loss of these spaces and filed a complaint. The investigation grew to encompass every disability space on campus–spaces that were a quarter-inch off had to be re-lined, signs were changed, lots were completely re-lined to meet requirements, etc. One complaint led to a two-year process of ensuring all spaces were acceptable and up to code.

While parking itself has met all requirements, the university is still–four years later–working to make changes to meet requirements demanded by the Office of Civil Rights. How many of you are quickly finding slope issues, space width issues? How many of your newly-painted or constructed lots were painted and signed by a contractor who did not know these regulations and left your disability spaces outside of compliance? I think you will be surprised to find it’s like a poison ivy: once you scratch it, it spreads everywhere!

Cloud Computing and Parking

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One of the great paradigm shifts in technology currently happening today is the use of the cloud. How it will eventually affect the parking industry is an open issue. It is already certain to affect how we store and process data and conduct business going forward. Operators and parking administrators must understand the implications and how best to deal with the cloud.Parking is currently affected by several changes:

  • Municipalities and cities have identified parking as a major source of income.
  • On-and off-street parking converge more and more into one business executed by one and the same party.
  • Road pricing, city tolls, and parking have started to converge.
  • Technology infrastructure and capabilities have changed radically.
  • As a consequence, things that have been tied together or tied to a location can now be executed independent of location or time constraints (e.g. identification or payment).

In this highly competitive, globalized world, the cloud provides those who embrace it with a competitive advantage. Competition usually mandates growth. Cloud technology will continue to grow faster, achieving more geographical coverage with less effort and investmentIn most cases, different parking management systems come from different vendors, to be installed and used at geographically diverse parking lots. Cloud technology is ideally suited to not only retrieve information, but to also control devices or applications remotely, independent of locations or time of day. Centralized cloud control is not only cheaper to implement, but also standardizes the way car parks can be managed, leading to reduced training and operational costs. And most importantly, it allows the automation of repetitive tasks, which leads to reduce cost combined with an increase in process quality.

Car park operators offer new types of services over the internet. Using the internet opens a totally new business domain and a path to new revenue sources. Cloud technology allows car park operators to benefit from direct access to consumers and engage in new business-to-consumer business models.

In addition, adopters can avoid costly upgrades, improve compliance through effective standardization, reduce service and overhead costs, and can improve data security and availability.

 

Smart Cities = Smart Drivers

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Whether you drive in Barcelona, San Francisco, or Sydney, parking your car can be a nightmare!

Every day millions of drivers around the world get stuck in traffic jams and waste precious hours looking for parking. Fortunately, smart technologies such as real-time traffic updates and real-time parking availability are starting to change that.

Combined with a meteoric rise in the number of connected vehicles on the road, new traffic technologies are starting to have a real effect on reducing traffic and congestion along with eliminating unnecessary time wasted driving around looking for parking.

To address the issue of unnecessary pollution and driver stress caused by searching for a parking space, a recent project focused on a real-time space availability service that received data on the number of available spaces from participating parking lots every few minutes. This information was then relayed in real-time to drivers using mobile and car navigation systems.

The project began to become more and more relevant when studied in relation to on-street/surface parking lots: Multi-story parking garages have the required barrier and/or loop infrastructure to calculate the number of available spaces, but surface parking lots and street spaces generally do not have any mechanisms to do the same thing.

Drivers could make intelligent parking decisions and drive to where there was space availability. They could see what their chances of finding a street parking space were based on the day and time of their arrival, even in locations that had no barriers or sensors installed. This also had a positive environmental effect as it reduced congestion, noise pollution, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

In terms of providing the information to end users, the data was integrated into car/mobile apps, which were now able to know final destination and current traffic conditions in real-time. The car/mobile app was able to give various options to the driver. An interesting element to the project was the use of historical payment transaction data to provide forecasts of parking space availability in the future.

The project went live with the City of Seattle and Westminster Council in London in 2012. I look forward to sharing more about it on Sunday, May 19 during the IPI Conference & Expo–hope to see you then!

 

 

Catch the Big One

Bonnie Watts

As I write this, I am exhilarated–and tired. I sure won’t be sending you a photograph of my desk this week. That’s because we opened exhibit sales for the 2013 IPI Conference & Expo and we’ve already broken our best opening-day record. It’s been a wild ride! I guess this is like hosting a Super Bowl in your city for our municipality members, or the freshman move-in day for our university members. A big day! An important day! By Day Two this week, we were 70 percent sold out–already bigger than any other parking conference or expo in the world–and I have a hunch the IPI Conference & Expo in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (on the ocean–such a beautiful place to be in May) will be our biggest show ever. Biggest and best. Behind the scenes, IPI staff is working to make the conference the best ever, on every level.

We’ve got new initiatives underway to ensure that we broaden the types of attendees who attend because we know there are important new ideas, products, and services that need to be shared in order to advance the parking profession–our primary mission. We’re looking at new ways to meet the needs of our attendees so that every day of the conference is full of learning, opportunity, and inspiration.

Mark your calendars now for May 19-22 and we promise to provide expertise that prepares you, technology that empowers you, and networking that moves you forward. And did I mention a whole lot of fun and long-lasting friendships, too?  To our wonderful sponsors and exhibitors (those who have already signed on, and those who may be planning to), I just wanted to say it’s a privilege to work in this industry.

 

 

It’s IPI Conference Presentation Call Time

Henry Wallmeyer

It may seem like we’re all still settling in from the 2012 IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix, but the IPI Conference Program Committee is already hard at work planning the 2013 event in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., May 19-22. If you’ve ever thought about giving a presentation at the largest gathering of parking professionals in the world and helping shape the future of your industry, this is the time to submit your proposal.

Experienced and articulate professionals who’d like to share their expertise and real-world experience with IPI Conference & Expo attendees are invited to submit proposals to present at next year’s event. The official call for presentation explains all the details, but there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Presentation proposals are due Oct. 1, 2012. The Conference Program Committee will review them immediately  after that date, so don’t be late with yours.
  • Presenters are entitled to a 25 percent discount off full or daily Conference registrations (CAPP candidates are not eligible for this discount). We cannot, however, provide fees or expense reimbursements.
  • Please don’t confuse educational sessions with Expo hall pitches. Make sure your educational session content is based on a relevant topic, concept, or idea, and not your services, products, company, or proprietary information.
  • Submit as many proposals as you want, but make your proposals great to rise above the rest.

To learn more about how the IPI Conference Program Committee judges and selects Conference session presenters, see the April 2012 issue of The Parking Professional .

There is no better venue than the IPI Conference & Expo to share your experience; it’s where parking professionals from around the world go for the game-changing thinking and innovation that will propel them and their businesses ahead. I hope you’ll be part of it and consider submitting your proposal by Oct. 1. Please let me know if you have questions, and see you in Ft. Lauderdale!

So Much to Learn!

L. Dennis Burns

I told a friend at this year’s IPI Conference and Expo in Phoenix that I couldn’t believe how much I was learning.

The pace of technological innovation continues at breakneck speed, but even more fascinating is the creative application of these advancements in parking management and sustainable transportation initiatives. Seattle, San Francisco, New York City, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C., are all pursuing advanced programs that could redefine parking’s relationship with technology and our interaction with larger transportation and environmental disciplines. Somewhat ironically, despite the cutting-edge technologies and creative system design and integration, the basic elements of communication, customer service, and effective program management continue to be core issues that need to be addressed.

The innovation and product development of an increasingly diverse set of vendors and suppliers was really eye-opening. New products and services (not to mention professional colleagues) from around the globe were some of the most exciting elements of this year’s conference for me.

Equally impressive were the advancements in mid-sized municipal programs. At the top of this list are Michael Klein’s innovative program in Albany, the incredible turnaround of the Cedar Rapids parking program (now known as “Park Cedar Rapids,” led by Vanessa Rogers and Jon Rouse) following the devastating floods of 2008, and the City of Lincoln’s strong and steady progress in going from “Good to Great” under Ken Smith’s leadership. These programs show the depth and penetration of the industry’s progress.

Another key area changing how we are perceived is facility design: parking being “better integrated into the urban form” and designed with sustainability and economic development in mind. A great way to stay abreast of the innovation and industry advancement in these areas is the IPI Awards of Excellence program. Look for more on this year’s winners in the July issue of The Parking Professional.

One final note: The selection of Rachel Yoka as IPI’s Parking Professional of the Year was the perfect choice! Congratulations, Rachel!

Hitting Our Stride

Casey Jones 4x5 (2)

I’ve run about 20 marathons and half marathons over the past 10 years and while each one is unique (talk about unique: at the Newport, Ore. marathon I ran in early June, runners were treated to raw Yaquina Bay oysters at miles 11 and 19), each also offers a similar ending, at least for me. As I hit the finisher’s chute elated and relieved to be finished, a sense of accomplishment washes over me quickly. After a few minutes, I regain a small amount of composure and find other runners to chat with about how the race went and what big race is next. There is an overwhelming sense of community, accomplishment, inspiration and yes, well-earned fatigue among the runners at the finish.

As we boarded buses heading back downtown after our closing fiesta event held at the Corona Ranch at the end of the 2012 IPI Conference and Expo in Phoenix, I couldn’t help feeling these same things. This fun, exciting, and at times surprising closing event capped off what I consider to be one of the very best conferences we’ve ever held. With more than 2,400 attendees, 220+ exhibitors, and 25 countries represented, it’s difficult not to feel a great sense of accomplishment and inspiration about where our industry has been and is heading. Thank you all for your part and for making this a memorable and hugely successful event.

Some think of life as a race with a start and finish and winners and losers. I think of life and running as a journey with hills and valleys and lots of water stations, and good company along the way.

IPI Conference & Expo Out with a Bang

Casey Jones on His HorseARVE Error: no video ID

 

A live rodeo in an outdoor arena, complete with performances by good-natured parking professionals, authentic Tex-Mex dinner, and spectacular fireworks display closed out the 2012 IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix with fun and friends.


IPI Chair Casey Jones kicked things off with an appearance on horseback in the middle of the ring at the Corona Ranch, before some unsuspecting Conference attendees were called out to wrangle calves, milk goats, and have some good old-fashioned Phoenix fun before their friends in the audience.

After a dinner together, attendees were invited outside for a surprise fireworks display that was met with much applause, before bidding goodnight with promises to meet again in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., May 19-22 for next year’s Conference & Expo.

Before all of that, it was another productive day at the Phoenix Convention Center…

Summit Explores How TDM Compliments Parking

A crowd gathered at the IPI Conference & Expo Wednesday morning to learn how parking professionals can integrate transportation demand management (TDM) strategies into their programs to help achieve mobility goals, during the Summit on TDM: Transportation Tools to Support Parking Program Effectiveness.

The one-day symposium, co-sponsored by IPI and the Association for Commuter Transportation (ACT), provided participants with a lot of practical, actionable information and case studies. The event was co-chaired by ACT president Brian Shaw, director of business services at The University of Pennsylvania, and Josh Kavanagh, director of transportation at the University of Washington.

In “Show Me the Money: The Business Case for TDM,” UrbanTrans North America president Joddie Gray, AICP, shared vital tips on transportation program funding. She noted that it’s important to create a strategic business plan, based on a clear picture of future transportation demand and desired transportation system performance.

Brian Shaw took to the podium to deliver “Setting the Stage: How Public Policy Can Create a Favorable Environment for Your TDM program.” Shaw explained how transportation programs are funded and how parking operations can be at the table to get their share of federal and other public resources.

Other speakers addressed “Getting What You’re Paying For: Metrics for TDM Programs,” “Building Your Operating Plan: Picking the Right Tools for the Job,” and other topics. The Summit’s afternoon panel discussions gathered the collective expertise of several speakers to field questions and provide guidance on implementing a variety of TDM strategies, in “An Operating Manual for Your TDM Tools.”

Media Crash Course: Speaking Parking Matters®

Wednesday’s general session brought Nick Calderone, owner of Reel Stories, and Phoenix CBS 5 News Anchor Sean McLaughlin to the General Session stage for a robust discussion on talking with the media.

“Nobody knows the information better than you,” said Calderone. “You’re in control.” He encouraged participants to remember going into a media interview that the reporter sought them out for their specific knowledge–”You are the smartest person in the room.”

The two presented their “Bes and Don’ts” for media interviews, encouraging parking professionals to be prepared, honest, passionate, expressive, accurate, and calm. “Everybody can tell if you’re not telling the truth,” said McLaughin. When faced with a reporter, they said, don’t lie, mislead, be evasive or defensive, speculate, or deny. And no matter what, don’t say “no comment.”

“Get that out of your brain,” said Calderone.

We Have Winners!

The last day of the IPI Expo meant lots of excitement on the floor as raffles were conducted and prizes were given away. Cheryl Woodward and Debra Wooden each won $500 in IPI’s Expo-Opoly game. After that, it was time to announce the year’s Best in Show exhibitor booths. Winners are:

  • Best in Show, 100-300 square feet
    •    First place: Eco Lights
    •    Second Place: Garage Juice Bar
    •    Third Place: Streetline
  • Best in Show, 400-600 square feet: Magnetic Autocontrol
  • Best in Show, 800-1200 square feet: Amano Mcgann
  • Best in Show, People’s Choice: Magnetic Autocontrol

Congratulations!

Media Coverage

The IPI Conference & Expo generated lots of press coverage, as reporters and cameras descended on the show floor to see all the latest in parking technology, products, services, and trends. A few highlights:

  • KPNX-TV the NBC affiliate in Phoenix featured a live morning interview with Casey Jones and reporter Jaclyn Schultz, complete with a smart parking meter and sensing device to show.
  • KNXV-TV the ABC affiliate in Phoenix featured an interview with IPI Chair Casey Jones.
  • KPHO –TV the CBS affiliate in Phoenix sent anchor Sean McLaughlin for a report for the 10 oclock news, but had so much fun he couldn’t tear himself away and stayed for more than an hour.
  • Sean Holstege, reporter for the Arizona Republic newspaper, toured the floor with Casey Jones and Immediate Past Chair Cindy Campbell, asking in-depth and probing questions about all the new technology.
  • Cindy Campbell was interviewed for Phoenix news radio station KTAR.
  • Casey Jones will be the guest on the radio program Business for Breakfast on MoneyRadio 1510.
  • Finally, the New York Times sent a videographer to the Expo.

Tuesday at the IPI Conference & Expo: Recognizing Achievement, Peering into a Crystal Ball

Mark Wright

Casey Jones (right) presents Roamy Valera with his Chairman's Award

Gary Means, CAPP, and Kim Jackson, CAPP, cranked up the spotlight Tuesday morning to present the 2012 IPI Professional Recognition Awards. Noting that the awards are given to parking pros who “exemplify excellence in their work everyday,” they presented plaques to:

  • Heather Medley (Texas Tech University): Parking Staff Member of the Year
  • June Broughton (Texas A&M University): Parking Supervisor of the Year
  • University of Maryland, College Park, Department of Transportation Services: Parking Organization of the Year
  • Rachel Yoka LEED AP BD+C, CNU+A, CPSM (Timothy Haas & Associates, Inc.): Parking Professional of the Year

Next, Board Chair Casey Jones, CAPP, presented the Chairman’s Award to Wanda Brown (UC Davis Health System) and Roamy Valera, CAPP (Standard Parking Corporation). Casey expressed his deep appreciation for their service and shared comments—both touching and amusing—from board members about both of them. (Hint: watch for salsa dancing at next year’s IPI Conference & Expo in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.!)

The Future of Parking

Attendees were then invited on a journey into the future of parking and mobility by Dr. George Hazel, FCIHT MICE FCILT OBE, chairman of MRC McLean Hazel. Opening with an adaptation of the blue pill/red pill challenge Morpheus issued to Neo in “The Matrix,” Hazel observed that while staying with an operational/regulatory “blue pill” view of parking and mobility is perfectly OK, trends around the globe reveal a whole new “red pill” paradigm centered primarily around the customer that savvy parking pros can leverage to their benefit.

Mobility will have to be seamless, be end user-focused, and offer customers value, he said. We need to think of this future as a retail model, not an operational model, he added, offering examples from around the globe of new apps and services that put the customer at the center of parking and mobility.

The question, said Hazel, is: Who’s going to shape, lead—and make money from—that “red pill” future? “If you don’t do it, someone else will. Maybe Google? Maybe Walmart? Who knows?”

He said he hopes a partnership model emerges, but it’s not clear yet in the journey who will do this. “The parking industry has a crucial part to play in cities in all sorts of ways,” he observed. But we need to understand these trends and explore potential business models.

The Expo

Exhibitors and Conference attendees enjoyed several hours on the show floor. Since the show opened, they’ve been joined by reporters from several news outlets. Yesterday, CBS’s Sean McLaughlin stopped to chat with parking professionals including Rachel Yoka, vice president of Timothy Haahs & Associates and the 2012 IPI Parking Professional of the Year.

Lunch was again served in the Expo hall, and attendees took advantage of education sessions before and after show hours.

Today at the Conference & Expo

It’s Free Expo Hall day! There is no charge to visit this year’s Expo today and guests are welcome.

Also today are a general session keynote on How to Maximize Media Opportunities and Speak Parking Matters®, the IPI/ACT Summit on TDM: Transportation Tools to Support Parking Program Effectiveness, more educational sessions, and the Viva la Fiesta industry closing event (tickets required), which should be a bang!

An Electric Day in Phoenix, in More Ways than One

Mark Wright

Monday proved another productive, enlightening day at the IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix, Ariz. After Executive Director Shawn Conrad, CAE, walked attendees through scenes from IPI’s first 50 years during Monday’s breakfast keynote session, Chair Casey Jones, CAPP, recognized current and outgoing members of the board, followed by the presentation of the 2012 IPI Awards of Excellence. (read more about this year’s winners in the July issue of The Parking Professional).

Keynote speaker Britta Gross, director, Global Energy Systems and Infrastructure Commercialization, General Motors, then took the stage with a simple message about a complex topic: Parking is very important to alternative fuel vehicles.

She outlined the three major options for fuel and propulsion systems on the market: plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), extended range EVs (EREV), and battery EVs (BEV). After talking about the technology behind her company’s Chevy Volt, she urged parking professionals to become familiar with EVSE (electrical vehicle supply equipment) suppliers, and recognize opportunities to make parking facilities EV-friendly. Toward that end, she concluded with seven steps to consider:

  1. Identify parking facilities where vehicles park for two or more hours.
  2. Prioritize residential (overnight) parking.
  3. Identify existing 120V outlets in parking facilities.
  4. Reach out to electric utilities for information.
  5. Consider 240V EVSE installations..
  6. Consider a valet parking solution to facilitate access to nearby EVSE installations.
  7. Explore solar power for EVSE installations for even greater sustainability benefits.

 

Florida Prize Winner Excited to be in Phoenix

Jacqueline Sablain was taking in the sights and sounds of her first IPI Conference & Expo, meeting people at her table during the Monday, June 11 breakfast keynote, when she found herself in the spotlight.

IPI Executive Director Shawn Conrad, CAE, welcomed Jacqueline during his opening remarks, noting that she was attending the show as the winner of the Florida Parking Association’s (FPA) Carol Easterling Scholarship Award grand prize for front-line employees. Here’s her winning video!

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As head clerk in the University of Central Florida’s Parking and Transportation Services office, Sablain said she focuses on turning negatives into positives. “I’m looking forward to learning as much as possible and looking for anything that helps us with our customer service,” she said Monday morning.

High on her must-attend list during the conference: the “Going Green” Arizona State University campus tour on Wednesday, and the “Parkaholics Anonymous: 12 Step Intervention” educational session on Tuesday that focuses on the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s program.

Expo Hall Opens to Fanfare

After Monday’s Awards of Excellence program and keynote address, parking professionals flooded the Expo hall to meet with vendors from all segments of the industry. Many attendees noted the larger size of the hall as compared with past years, and later returned Monday afternoon for a reception that was complete with live music, refreshments, and a slice of IPI’s 50th birthday cake.

Today at the Conference & Expo

Tuesday kicks off with a general session keynote by Dr. George Hazel on “The Future of Parking in Cities” (read more about that in the November 2011 issue of The Parking Professional), and the 2012 Professional Recognition Awards. A full morning and afternoon of educational sessions and off-site facility tours are complemented by lunch and several hours in the Expo Hall, with even more Power Pitch offerings. it’s going to be a full day in Phoenix!

All Roads Lead to Technology

EmergingTrends_100sq

According to a new survey released today by the International Parking Institute (IPI), technology, sustainability, revenue-generation, and customer service are the top trends in the parking industry and the things most parking professionals are looking for.

The 2012 Emerging Trends in Parking Survey was released at the IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix, Ariz., this morning. It showed that cashless, electronic, and automatic payment systems join apps that provide real-time information about parking rates and availability and wireless sensing devices that help improve traffic management as the top in-demand technologies in the industry.

More than one-third of respondents said that demand for sustainable services is a top trend, and that they’re talking about energy-efficient lighting, parking space guidance systems, automatic payment process, solar panels, renewable energy technology, and systems that accommodate electric vehicles and/or encourage alternative methods of travel. Technologies that help people find parking faster take cars off the road; an estimated 30 percent of people driving around cities at any time are looking for parking, wasting fuel and emitting carbons.

Survey participants also said that convincing urban planners, local governments, and architects to include parking professionals in their early planning processes is a priority; doing that, they said, would help prevent many design problems in final projects. And when asked where parking should be included as a course of study in academic institutions, nearly half of the survey participants said schools of urban study, followed by business or public policy schools.

The full survey can be accessed on IPI’s website.

IPI Conference & Expo Buzzing with Activity

parking-expo-learning-lab

The 2012 IPI Conference & Expo kicked off over the weekend with the 19th Annual CAPP Classic Golf Tournament, a reception for international and first-time attendees, an in-depth Learning Lab, the Sunsational Phoenix Meet & Mingle Reception, CAPP graduation, and educational sessions in five specialized tracks. It was a busy two days in Phoenix!

Learning Lab Goes In-Depth

L. Dennis Burns, CAPP; Barbara Chance, Ph.D. and Josh Kavanagh, CAPP spent Sunday morning facilitating small-group discussions that focused on downtown, privatization, and university issues, before delving into case studies that were designed to be informative and challenging:

  • The downtown group focused on the strategic planning process that Fort Collins, Colo., used to explore the possibility of adopting paid parking, and reviewed the nine recommendations in the city’s plan.
  • The university discussion centered on a fictitious campus that experienced an 8 percent population increase that created parking supply-and-demand issues.
  • The privatization group had the perspectives of two parking pros from U.S. municipalities contrasting with two private sector property specialists from Lima, Peru. All found themselves struggling to balance short-term revenue pressures with long-term market realities.

Participants applauded the Learning Lab’s format, process, and topic mix, and said they valued the opportunity for quality networking.

 

Global Parking Association Summit Meeting

IPI Chair Casey Jones, CAPP, told participants at the first IPI Global Parking Association Summit Meeting how proud he was that they traveled from points around the globe to gather together and talk about parking and their individual associations.

Leaders from parking associations in Spain, Canada, Norway, Brazil, Great Britain, and the U.S. met for several hours Sunday afternoon, discussing the various challenges faced by the parking profession in their individual countries, and the ways the industry was similar around the world. The invitation-only event was especially appropriate this year, said Jones, as the IPI Conference & Expo hosted parking professionals from 25 different countries.

After friendly discussion about their associations and the nuances of each country’s parking industry, the group settled in to talk about Parking Matters®, and the friendships that were forged over the conference table. Follow-up events are anticipated.

CAPP Graduation

Sunday night, 13 parking professionals graduated from the Certified Administrator of Public Parking (CAPP) program, earning their certifications before a crowd of their peers after two rigorous years of study.
The newest CAPP-certified professionals are:

Ross L. Allanson, CAPP, Ampco System Parking

Pamela Corbin, CAPP, City of Orlando, Florida

Gordon G. Dash, CAPP, City of Raleigh, North Carolina

Michael Drow, CAPP, Standard Parking Corporation

James Horski, CAPP, Ampco System Parking

Natasha Labi, CAPP, Parking Company of America

Jeffrey A. LaGesse, CAPP, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Amy K. Orr, CAPP, College of Charleston.

Danette L. Perry, CAPP, City of Berkeley, California Transportation

Krishna D. Singh, CAPP, University of Central Florida

Gregory J. Stormberg, CAPP, Parkmobile USA, Inc.

Paul N. Whetzel, CAPP, Charleston County Government

Sandra L. Ziegler, CAPP, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Today at the Conference & Expo

Today will be another busy one for IPI Conference & Expo attendees. Things kick off with a keynote presentation by Britta Gross, director, global energy systems and infrastructure commercialization, General Motors, followed by the grand opening of the Expo. Another round of educational sessions promise to inspire and inform, and a reception on the Expo Hall floor rounds out the day. Check back here tomorrow for highlights!

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

IPI Expo

As the song says, my bags are packed and I’m ready to go–it’s time for the 2012 IPI Conference & Expo!

Whether you’re joining us for the world’s largest parking event or not (and I hope you are!), it’ll be worth checking back here every day next week. We’ll be posting all the news from Phoenix right here on the Parking Matters® Blog, and this is the place to read about what’s already happened and what’s coming up at the Conference & Expo. If you haven’t already, this is a great time to subscribe to the blog–just fill in your email address in that “Subscribe to Posts” box to the right, and our updates will arrive in your email automatically.

You can also keep up with us on Twitter: follow @IntlParkingInst and the hashtag #IPIconference. Because you’re already reading the blog, I’ll give you a little inside scoop: we’ll be giving away some great prizes to people who retweet our Conference updates next week. It’s worth the follow!

Finally, keep an eye out for our newly-appointed Conference Ambassadors, wearing these buttons in Phoenix:

These friendly volunteers have stepped up to answer questions, direct attendees to events and resources, and help orient our newest members and guests to everything going on. They’ll kick things off at the Welcome and Orientation for First Time and International Attendees at 5:15 p.m. on Sunday, June 10 in the Convention Center North Hall B-E Foyer (by IPI Registration), and then stick around to help out for the rest of the Conference.

I hope you’ll join us in Phoenix, and keep up with us here if you can’t make it this year. It’s going to be a fantastic IPI Conference & Expo!

On to Phoenix!

Casey Jones 4x5 (2)

I remember my first IPI Conference & Expo vividly. I was serving as a contractor to a city, and my client suggested that I attend. Up to that point I had no knowledge of what IPI was all about and why attending the conference was all that important. Quite honestly, I wasn’t all that excited to go. Being away from the office felt risky and the thought of the catch-up work I’d face on my return was a bit overwhelming. But I needed to be responsive to my client’s requests so I sucked it up and got on a plane headed for Las Vegas, not expecting much.

I could not have been more wrong about the importance of that Conference. In fact, my time there flew by. I made connections with people I continue to work with today, and that trip launched what I consider to be the most important professional association of my career.

Each year IPI’s Conference & Expo simply gets better and this year will be no different. From our world-class general session speakers to our largest-in-the-industry Expo to the chance to greet new and old friends in the halls of the Phoenix Convention Center, this is the event I look forward to all year long.

If you’ve not yet registered, it’s not too late: visit www.parking.org/conference for details. If you have, I’ll see you in Phoenix. I look forward to advancing the parking profession with all of you next week!

Parking’s Beautiful Images

L. Dennis Burns

I admit it, I really like parking! When you truly get absorbed into a profession or any area of serious interest, there is no end to the dimensions and nuances you can see that are lost on others.

Not many things have captured my interest as much as parking, but the one that has is photography! Stick a camera in my hand and I can wander happily for hours and hours no matter where I am. Check out this cool image from an off the beaten path parking lot in Seattle!

I was thrilled to learn that IPI had found a way to merge two of my favorite things into a friendly competition: The Parking Professional Photo Contest! How great is that!

The categories for submissions include:

  • Beautiful
  • Funny
  • People in Parking
  • Structure/Lot
  • Nature
  • Most Offbeat or Unusual

Every photo submitted will also be considered for the Best in Show award, which comes with a free registration to the 2013 IPI Conference & Expo in Ft. Lauderdale, and publication on the cover of a future issue of The Parking Professional. Winners of individual categories will receive Parking Matters® shirts and see their photos published in the magazine as well.

I can’t wait to see the kinds of images that will be submitted. Imagine trying to capture the essence of our profession in photographs. The possibilities are endless! I’m already searching my files for the perfect parking picture. I hope you will join me!

Want more info? Go to: www.parking.org/photocontest.

IPI Conference & Expo: There’s an App for That

Bonnie Watts

Imagine being able to plan your time at the 2012 IPI Conference & Expo down to making notes on a map of exhibitors to see, products to check out, and speakers to add to your can’t-miss list. Then, imagine slipping all of that right into your pocket so it would be with you throughout the Conference.

As the saying goes, we’ve got an app for that!

IPI’s new 2012 Conference & Expo mobile app is downloadable at no charge from the iTunes store. It puts an interactive guide to the Conference right in your iOS device, and is a terrific tool for planning before you head to Phoenix (it’s available now) or once you’re on-site.

The new app includes:

  • Schedule at a Glance.
  • Sessions, including clickable speaker email links.
  • Exhibitors, including a floor plan with space for your notes, information on their products and services, and clickable email links.
  • A link to IPI’s Twitter feed.
  • A list of IPI Conference & Expo Strategic Partners.
  • My Planner, which allows you to star sessions or exhibitors that are of particular interest and build a customized planner for the Conference.

We hope this new tool will help you make the most of your Conference experience. See you in Phoenix!

Future Mobility and Parking

George McLean Hazel, OBE

Trends in mobility are opening up a world of new opportunities for the parking industry. In the future, mobility will have to be user-focused, seamless, and valued–this is non-negotiable. The trend is being driven by socio-economic factors such as the desire for personalized services and value; technological factors such as smart phones and apps; and retailing factors, with retailers moving from selling products to selling lifestyles. This is happening all over the world. The key question for those in the parking industry is: do they want to drive this agenda or be driven? (if you’ll pardon the pun!)

A new business area is emerging–mobility management–in which a range of services is combined, integrated, and managed for individual users. There are two broad implications for parking. At the city level, parking systems will control supply and demand virtually, dynamically adjusting prices according to prescribed targets. There will also be operational savings, as much on-street equipment will not be needed because the system will know where each vehicle is and where each parking space is. The system will work on retailing principles, segmenting the market to a fine level, operating a behavioral choice model and incentivizing the customer with respect to stated objectives. Such a system could be owned and operated by the private sector or franchised by the city authority and operated by the private sector. Both business models are relevant and need to be developed. The key point is that such a system can be used to achieve commercial, economic, environmental, or social objectives, depending who controls it.

At the individual level, personalized mobility packages will be developed at various levels of complexity and offered to users. These packages will tell the user where all the available spaces are, what the prices are, give them the ability to extend the parking time remotely, and give access to other value added services such as pre-booking of spaces, booking of restaurants, etc. Customers will be incentivized through loyalty systems and offers.

Private businesses and public sector agencies in the parking industry have a choice to make in the near future. Do they want to shape, develop, design, and manage these systems, or do they want to remain operators? Both choices are valid and legitimate businesses, but the decision will have major implications for the individual business and perhaps for the city.

Technology: On-Street Star Wars

Brett Wood

Over the past 10 or so years, the parking industry has seen a revolution in technology, especially in the way we operate and manage the curb spaces in our communities. On-street meters have evolved from the mechanical devices implemented in Oklahoma City in 1935 to digital models with greater flexibility in enforcement and maintenance, through a quantum leap to today’s credit card-accepting, ATM-like machines with interfaces that allow us to pay for parking, get directions, and potentially make a cup of coffee.

Parking meters are probably the most visible of our technological advances, but there are many complimentary uses that help us manage on-street parking:

  • Handheld enforcement devices for our enforcement staff make it easier to find, enforce, and document parking violations.
  • In-space or pole mounted sensors provide us the data we need to drive our programs and know who’s parking where, when, and for how long. This data can be used to better enforce parking, set dynamic rates, and provide real-time availability to users.
  • Smartphone applications are providing the where and what to our customers in a better way, helping drivers make informed decisions about where to park before they reach their destinations and circle for blocks.
  • These same applications are finding their way to in-car navigation, helping drivers with turn-by-turn directions to available parking.

We are truly in the midst of a technological boom in the parking industry. The only question is, is this the beginning or the end? I guess we will have to wait until the IPI Conference & Expo in Phoenix, June 10-14, to find out what exciting new features and applications are in store for the parking industry.

Until then, let the force (of better on-street parking) be with you.